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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 245 (some duplicates have been removed)
at sharp are also betting on one unique technology to bring business back. we explain. >> reporter: engineers at sharp looked into the future and the monitors, public computers and in smartphones too. the new liquid crystal display technology is called igzo. it reduces power consumption by a fifth. only sharp owns this technology, for now. >> translator: smartphone batteries that last longer are very appealing. >> reporter: in december, a market research firm ranked smartphones with a igzo panel as the number one seller in japan. >> translator: we're getting many inquiries of products. that would certainly boost our sales. >> reporter: sharp executives are pinning hopes on this technology? >> translator: igzo is contributing a lot to improving our business. >> analysts say sharp executives may need to learn more from their past mistakes. executives invested nearly $5 billion to increase production lines for liquid crystal displays. it didn't take long for south korean and taiwanese competitors to catch up. sharp eventually lost in the price war and posted a steep decline in profits
been working with us, with sf city as i mentioned earlier, spur, our department of technology, our committee on information technology, and then we have an open data working group which really tries to get volunteers from the different departments to work together and see what other kinds of data analytics that we could provide to the public. >>> i want to just say today, you're going to hear some demonstration projects that are already started with our open data. again, as a way to celebrate innovation month, not only are we opening up different companies throughout san francisco, but we want to also encourage, examples we're going to be announcing yoyo working with phil ginsberg to provide data where are small parks or where the events are happening. what is the cost? how to get there in the hours that they're operating? a smart phone application for all of our events in recreation and park department, that to me is going to be invaluable to visitors and to our neighborhoods. bronwin who is working with us on data information from neighborhoods in our city, growth trends, that ki
in california that's training the next generation of students in this revolutionary technology. "if used correctly, this technology has the potential to change the game for manufacturing in the united states." the revolutionary manufacturing technology of rapid tech at the university of california-irvine is paving the way for small businesses to produce three dimensional prototypes on a budget. "for the small guy it's a little harder to get access to this technology, and that's kinda what we're here for. we want to give smaller companies access to this technology to let them be more competitive." rapid tech's printers are able to create objects - layer-by- layer - in three dimensions, and can print prototypes within a matter of hours. this saves companies time and money when correcting design flaws, and, more importantly, when going after market share. "first, when a company engages with us, we want to make sure that when they go out to get it manufactured, they have all the correct files and the correct data - all the correct tools to give to the manufacturer. it lets a little company r
to me a technology geek's really dream, is to have all of this data available so that we can mine them in different ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is goin
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
of the worst technology in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust for public land said we have the best urban park system
out how we advanced to the next stage, how we build out these clean technologies and diverse technologies that will allow us to do your choices. more and do it in a clean and environmentally responsible way. raising our energy costs, imposing the mandates, other heavy handed ideas but are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they will not pass. we have tried it once. so, what we need to be doing as we move forward, rulemaking efforts, as we know, which will try to take things in a direction that i would disagree with. we need to find ways to develop those technologies that allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. so, we need to develop the resources that we have today. we do it domestically, cut our dependence, taking a portion of that revenue and specifically dedicating it in it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about our energy funds and how they would build out and truly help us advance. that is kind of the framework. it is good reading. it is thoughtful reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on critically important t
where a lab called energetics technologies has reported some of the biggest energy gains yet. >> we are delivering power into the cell. >> when i got there, i just kept asking about, okay, how do you know this? how do you know that? how to you get 30%? >> duncan spent two days examining cold fusion experiments... >> i mean, i'm just skeptical, because i'm always skeptical. >> and investigating whether the measurements were accurate. >> do you measure that aluminum temperature directly? or just assume it's equal to-- >> and when you walked down to the israeli lab, you thought what? >> i thought, "wow, they've done something very interesting here." >> he crunched the numbers himself and searched for an explanation other than a nuclear effect. >> i found that the work done was carefully done. and that the excess heat, as i see it now, is quite real. >> are you surprised to hear yourself saying this? >> very much. i never thought i'd say that. >> and we found that the pentagon is saying it too. the defense advanced research projects agency, known as darpa, did its own analysis, and we o
. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort ... individualized. at the ultimate sleep number event, queen mattresses start at just $599 . and save 50% on our innovative limited edition bed. >> marketing pro, he is here talking about the much-anticipated super bowl commercials. before we run down the favorites, a lot of super bowl ads were released ahead of time on the internet, that is a newer trend, a lot of times it was hush, hush, so why are they watching them before the game. >> people enjoy them, and anticipate watching them again during the super bowl. so it builds the anticipation and they get more bang for their buck, because people are watching them on youtube. >> you will watch them anyway, because you want to watch them with everyone else etch if you saw it. >> let's run down them. >> this one right here is a coca-cola spot, take a loo
figures out how we advanced to that next stage, how we build out these technologies, clean technologies and diverse technologies that allow us to do more and do it in no way that is an environmentally responsible way. imposing the mandates of other heavy hand of ideas that are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. they are not going to pass congress. what we need to be dealing, as we move forward, there will be rolled-making efforts. -- rule-making efforts. need to find those ways that we develop the technologies to really allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. we need to develop resources that we have today, do it domestically so we cut our dependence on opec. take a portion of that revenue and we specifically dedicate it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about the energy deployment fund and how it will build out and advance. that is the framework. it is good reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on a critically important topic. . do see a lot of new changes happening to the new administration. how could we summarize those chang
. >>> eyes in the sky. unmanned drones, wartime technology roaming the skies here at home. who are they watching, and why? >>> the struggle. new jersey governor chris christie is in the middle of a fight erupting in public over his own weight. tonight what a former white house doctor said about him and how he fired back. >>> and one year from tonight, if you can believe it, opening ceremonies at the winter olympics. tonight we'll show you the resort town packed with palm trees where they hope to have snow on the slopes a year from now. "nightly news" begins now. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening. for the folks who have moved to an all-electronic web-based life, today's news maybe wasn't all that impactful. but for the folks with mailboxes in cities and towns across this countron dirt roads or in apartment buildings, there's always been mail on saturday. six days a week, since the time of abraham lincoln. but today the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturda
claim north korea used bann enn missile technology. >>> right now, vice president joe biden is meeting with leaders in germany. earlier this morning, he talked about iran's nuclear ambitions at a security conference in munich. he says there's still room for diplomacy if iran is willing to make a good faith effort. >>> today marks one year since the murder of a transgender woman in northeast d.c. mayor vincent gray will be among those attending a vigil today at the bus stop where she was murdered. jones was waiting for a bus at the intersecti-- when she was s the face. she later died from her injuries. >>> a maryland community is coming together to help a family who lost two of their daughters in a massive house fire. the fire broke out late thursday night on highland avenue in frederick county. 3-year-old sophie and 6-year-old madigan died of smoke inhalation. four members of the family survived. neighbors describe the chaos as they saw the house go up in flames. >> she wasn't screaming like words. it was just like a painful scream. >> absolutely devastated. a mother's worst nightmare.
play a limited role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expeive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the issues, even after fushima, can-- it can be managed. >> rose: so it's the cost, not the safety. >> it's the cost and it's the nature of the, of the cost accounting. they're only in a thousand to 1200 megawatts, that means that they used to cause 4 or 500 million, now it's 5, 6, 8 billion dollars. if takes a long time. you don't want to build increments that are that big that take that long. particularly in an age like the '70s after the oil shocks where you don't know what conservation and efficiency and renewables wil
been a part of life. >>> eyes in the sky. unmanned drones, wartime technology roaming the skies here at home. who are they watching, and why? >>> the struggle. new jersey governor chris christie is in the middle of a fight erupting in public over his own weight. tonight what a former white house doctor said about him and how he fired back. >>> and one year from tonight, if you can believe it, opening ceremonies at the winter olympics. tonight we'll show you the resort town packed with palm trees where they hope to have snow on the slopes a year from now. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening. for the folks who have moved to an all-electronic web-based life, today's news maybe wasn't all that impactful. but for the folks with mailboxes in cities and towns across this country on dirt roads or in apartment buildings, there's always been mail on saturday. six days a week, since the time of abraham lincoln. but today the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop
delivering a 21st-century product. >> reporter: at the crossroads of tradition, history and technology. the letter carriers' union, as well as some businesses, don't like this plan, but the postal service says that's already cut 28% of its work force, 200 mail processing centers, and 21,000 routes over the last few years. it's not enough. brian? >> tom costello, starting us off in glen echo, maryland tonight. tom, thanks. >>> now to the other american institution facing a very big change. tonight the boy scouts of america have put off a decision on changing their policy on admitting gay scouts and scout leaders. the organization's board of directors which was set to vote on the issue today instead delayed any consideration of a change for at least three months. an explanation tonight from nbc's pete williams. >> we all need to repent -- >> reporter: outside boy scout headquarters in dallas, scouting parents brought their children, opposing any change and relieved by the delay. >> the membership is very against this. and instead you've got a little group that doesn't really represent us
attack helicopter, using stealth technology to evade detection. boeing started make the comanche in the 1990s but i think they done make them anymore. i also don't know if it is all of our attack helicopters. but lots of the different kinds of attack helicopters that we have or that we have had as a country, the cobra, the apache, the comanche, also the viper, the kiowa, the blackhawk, all the helicopters that we use in military operations and even some of them that we don't use anymore, they are all capable of firing this. this specific thing. this is about five feet long. its diameter is about seven inches. it weighs about 100 pounds. this has actually gone through a bunch of different variations since it was first launched in 1978. but it always stays roughly the same size and shape so it can be fitted as a missile onto tons of different aircraft over time. boeing's history page on this particular exploding projectile explains how it got its name. it turns out it's an acronym. it's an acronym for helicopter launched fire and forget missile. so the acronym is hellfire. helicopt
yourself and the american public wants to be able, semi-automatic technology has been around for 100 years. if you limit the american public's access to semi-automatic technology, you limit their ability to survive. if someone is invading your house, you should not say you should only have five or six shots you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, not what some politician thinks is "reasonable." >>chris: a couple of weeks ago the n.r.a. started running an ad that create as great deal of controversy. here is a clip. >> are the president's kids more important than years? why is high skeptical about putting armed security in our schools? his kids are protected by our tax money. >>chris: do you regret putting up that ad? >> it wasn't picking on the president's kids. the president's kids are safe and we are. >> thankful for it. the point --. >>chris: they face a threat that most children do not face. >>guest: tell that to the people in newtown. >>chris: do you think the president's children are the same kind of target as every schoolchild in america? that is ridiculous and you know
or blackberry to understand the application of technology and what makes it work and what doesn't make it work. >> is very difficult to make investment decisions and expect any kind of return on investment and have no way to predict the future. our difficulty right now is that there is no consistency or certainty in our policy decisions. >> of the government's role in technology and policy from this technology show. >> this week on "q&a" -- mark shields discusses his early career in politics and his transition to journalism. >> mark shields -- can you remember the first time you did work in front of an audience
. they are a technology company but more on the technology side for engineers, people with computer science experience people working in supply chain. what's great about raytheon they do a lot of security but it's web security internet security and those threats are real to this country right now. maryland. massachusetts, virginia, 450 positions they need 350 fresh college grads if you will but you have to have the technological experience. >> it is getting the car title done and this is a growing business people need money. 360 jobs nationwide. you can be a customer service rep and make up to 25,000 a year you can be a store manager make 45,000 and gm's up to 150,000. >> northwestern mutual. a lot of people like working for mutual companies they tend to be more safe and stable. >> what's nice about northwestern mutual they are helping people work on their finances with 401 k. they need financial advisors. we are in this period where americans are afraid of the stock market and 401 k investments they want to make sure they have the right plan in place they have financial positions open right now. they
wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. >> what did you just say, ray? after four years on the job and more than 300 billion taxpayer dollars for transportation projects, ray la hood pushing to spend even more cash on what he calls a bold plan to fix america's roads and he says you'll be on board. >> i tone think you'd be turning off people in america because they know america is one big pothole right now. >> why didn't we fill the potholes instead of spending stimulus money on things like the ramps to nowhere. you've got to be kidding me. e-mail us or tweet us at team cavuto. >> meanwhile, to virginia and a bat over the governor's transportation plan there. it would eliminate the gas tax and replace it with a small hike in state sales tax. the republican governor on where things stan right now. governor, thank you for joining us. >> thank you, sir. >> you w
around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort ... individualized. at the ultimate sleep number event, queen mattresses start at just $599 . and save 50% on our innovative limited edition bed. >> who can make harness out of haywire, who planting time will finish his 40 hour week by tuesday noon. and put in another. david72 hours so god madea farm. david: that ma magnificent doj , showing how america used to be. a police sergeant said he was due overtime pay, but he was not on the clock. he was answering worker mails on his blackberry. sherri, is this a good way of the way work ethic used to be. >> it is right on target, chicago police deputy should be ashamed. you have to look they want overtime for e-mails, which everyone is doing these days, we don't consider it all that extra. but same time we have outgoing secretary of defense leon panetta saying we're cutting pay of our troops in c
in chicago it would cut crime but the basic right is to protect yourself and the -- semi-automatic technology has been around 100 years and if you limit the american public's access to semi-automatic technology, you limit their ability to survive. if someone is invading your house, i mean, you shouldn't say you should only have five or six shots, you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, a woman should, not what a politician thinks is reasonable. >> chris: a couple of weeks ago the nra started running an ad that created a great deal of controversy. here's a clip: >> are the president's kids more important than yours? why is he skeptical about putting armed security in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards at their school? >> chris: mr. lapierre, do you regret putting up that ad? >> the point of ad was this, not -- >> you mentioned the president's kids. >> they are safe and we are thankful for it. the point -- >> they face a threat most children do not face. >> tell that to people in newtown -- >> do you really think the president's children are the same kind of ta
for him to win. now, that's a good thing. it shows the democrats have got the technology and the organizational skills down to do that. but that can be matched in time by another party. the democrats to some extent were going to school on what the republicans were doing to them in 2004 when we had a close elections and it was won by massive turnout operation bias karl rove and the republican national committee that turned out voters at the democrats in places like ohio didn't even know were there. so, you know, and with barack obama at the evidence the ticket, they were able to do that this time around. with him not there anymore, it will depend a lot on who the candidate is as to whether they're able to replicate anything like that strong. >> bill: this influences everybody's lives, all our lives if the president is indeed taking on a more arrogant posture in the sense that he is going to move as far as left as he wants to move because he says why not? i'm not going to get these people anyway. we don't need them anymore. california going to be mostly hispanic. hispanics
years since the sniper case the technology has come a long way in terms of providing additional tools that law enforcement can use to hopefully track this individual down. >> well, good insight. montgomery county police chief thomas manger, thanks for weighing in on the search for a killer in california. we are all hoping they get this guy soon. >> absolutely. certainly our condolences go out to the families of those officers that were slain. >> i share that with you, sir. thank you. >>> for decades football fans have been singing hail to the redskins, but some people say it's time for the team to change its name. coming up hear both sides of the debate and we also want to hear your comments. >> coming up on the news edge at 11:00 some california senators are paying up as they're making a friend -- after making a friendly wager on the super bowl. stay with us. fox 5 news at 10:00 just getting started.  >>> what's in name? a whole lot of controversy for the redskins with a whole lot of people calling the name demeaning and racial. today there was a meeting at the smithso
surprised me is how powerful the capability is in our whole technical space. we have such technological advantage there. the real issue for us is we have to move that technological advantage from being just about pc peripherals to pc peripherals and mobile peripherals, like tablets. >> i want to show people, maybe can you do it, it is a cover for an ipad mini that doubles as a keyboard. >> it is. and we love -- >> these kind of things are the future of your company. >> absolutely. we love this. we call this is the other half of the ipad. as can you see, it looks like the other half on the outside. magnetically attached to the back. comes apart. >> it is quite a full size keyboard. these keys are not mini. >> not at all. you will be shocked. >> not mouse type. >> no pun intended. you will be shocked when you use it. it is really is a full size keyboard. >> you took a write down over video conferencing business the company brought for something north of $400 million few years ago. >> that right. >> there is a discussion whether you will hold on to that video conferencing business. >> as i
now where technology is kind of moving ahead of some of the cultural norms that have been seat. there was the 40-hour workweek for the longest time -- megyn: boy -- melissa: boy, when was that? [laughter] >> exactly. the american dream, huh? people would go home and have their leisure time, and now with smartphones and blackberries, you know, that's completely, um, that's really not the reality for a lot of americans. melissa: do they have a case? >> according to the suit, police brass pressured subordinates in the department's organized crime bureau to answer work-related calls and e-mails on their blackberries, and then they dissuaded the officers from filing for overtime. and then the cops are saying, whoa. and the only way you could be promoted was by -- melissa: are you doubting that? i mean, have you -- >> oh, no, i'm not doubting at all. melissa: you go in to work the next day, and they go didn't you get my e-mail? >> but that is how we succeed in america. basically, it's on a merit-based system. so, yeah, the detective that does go the extra yard, he gets them a sausage
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. it would include the ipad or the iphone. this is according to a technology web site. just because apple did file for the patent, it does not mean make a go of the technology. we do have sky news in the skies. airways and us u.s. american airlines are trying to terms of a merger deal by terrorists 15 if. however they are trying to how theut details on ownership would be split between american's creditors and u.s. airways investors. a deal would create the world's airline, if they pull it off. the ladies, it seems washington is the place to be poor working women. be for ace to been foworking working women. median income of of,000, triple the salary paid cities for women. d.c. does attract highly workted professionals who in high-paying fields such as law.ics and linda bell reporting for abc 7 news. back to you. >> thank you. 5:56 now, 32 degrees. if you attended or watched wednesday night's blizzards -- game, and spotted the magic johnson in the crowd. (vo) they were married for... 53 years. she was his everything. he can't live alone anymore. but we don't have the room. so, we talked to sunt
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 245 (some duplicates have been removed)